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Neurocontrol Freehand System

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The NeuroControl Freehand System is a myoelectric prosthetic hand designed for use by individuals who have quadriplegia as a result of a spinal cord injury and have some use of an upper arm or shoulder. The system is an implanted medical device which enables many with quadriplegia to regain the use of a paralyzed hand. It combines neural prosthetics, using electrical stimulation to replace the original nerve impulses whose pathway is interrupted by spinal cord injury, with conventional reconstructive hand surgery. The system includes electrodes surgically attached to the muscles of the hand and forearm, a pacemaker-style stimulator implanted in the chest, and a transmitting coil worn externally on the skin over the location of the implanted stimulator. Shoulder movements, monitored by a shoulder position sensor, control the Freehand System. A separate external controller which can be attached to the user's wheelchair provides the power supply and the "brains" for the system. If determined to be medically necessary, tendon transfer surgery may also be necessary. With the system, small shoulder movements control the opening and closing of the hand. Depending upon the individual, the system may enable independent feeding or grooming, use of the telephone writing, etc.

Available

Price Check
as of: 
10/15/2000
Additional Pricing Notes: 

Contact manufacturer

Neurocontrol Freehand System

Made By:

Neurocontrol Corporation
Neurocontrol Corporation Organization Type: 
Manufacturer
Address: 
Email address: skrebs@neurocontrol.com
Phone: 800-378-6955
Fax: 216-912-0129
Phone (U.S. and Canada): 
216-912-0101
Web Address: 
http://www.neurocontrol.com
Tags: 
Prosthetics, Therapeutic Aids